Wednesday Webcomics: No Revolution is “A Small Revolution”

A Small Revolution

A Small Revolution by Boum takes place in a dystopian future where revolution brews in the city’s corners. Originally published in French by Front Froid editions, this critically acclaimed and emotionally compelling comic explores the human side of injustice and revolt in just a few chapters.

Florence isn’t that much into politics, but she knows that the injustices she witnesses every day aren’t something to pass by without a word. Her fellow street orphans can’t afford health care, one of the privileges of the higher class, including her friend Auguste who suffers from lung disease. A record of Boris Vian’s music provides her the hope that the dictatorship will be abolished tomorrow. She wants to join in on overthrowing the government, but Dominique and the other revolutionaries insist that she stay behind. She’s still a child. But she’s also willing to fight for a better future, even if it takes years.

A Small Revolution screengrab 1

A Small Revolution doesn’t dwell on the politics and events that have led to this future; however, the story spares enough details to create a full image of this world. The mention of starving orphans and secret meetings between revolutionaries shows what’s at stake. Brief interactions between Florence and the other revolutionaries display their perceptions and motives. The comic stands out for its more personal look of a dystopian future rather than focusing on the politics or action. Florence learns that being a revolutionary is more than wielding weapons and attending protests.

A Small Revolution screengrab 2

Florence’s story is a personal account of a world in turmoil and uncertain times. It’s also a story of hope even in the face of injustice. No rebellion is too quiet, and no revolution is too small.

A Small Revolution is available to read online. A print version is available for purchase at Soaring Penguin Press.

For more great webcomic recommendations, check out our Wednesday Webcomics archives!

Author: Brahidaliz Martinez

Brahidaliz (pronounced Bra-da-leez) is a 2019 graduate of American University’s MFA in creative writing program. They’re a submissions editor for Uncanny Magazine. Their various areas of interest include intersectionality in apocalyptic and disaster films, Artificial Intelligence, writing for animation, YA SFF, and LGBTQ+ representation in children’s media.

Pronouns: he/they
Location: DC Metro area

Twitter: @brahidaliz


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