Lost Girl at C2E2: An Interview with Paul Amos and Emmanuelle Vaugier

Today I had the chance to sit down with Paul Amos and Emmanuelle Vaugier from Lost Girl at C2E2. Paul plays Vex on the show, and Emmanuelle is Evony, also known as the Morrigan (the leader of the Dark Fae). This show is one of my favorites, and although we are entering the final season, it is definitely one you should check out if you like modern fantasy. Here is my interview:

Q: Most Geekiary fans know you from Lost Girl. What did you love most about playing Vex and Evony?

EV: They gave me a lot of great dialogue that was fun, and quippy one-liners. I think I had some pretty epic one-liners. [To Paul] And when we got to play together, that was fun. Then they separated us, that wasn’t so much fun.

PA: Not so much. They realized that if they put us together too much, people would demand a spinoff, you know, Vex and the Morrigan. That would have run at least ten seasons. People would just want that; who cares about the lost girl?

Q: Going along with that, a lot of times, your characters provided much needed comic relief. Since those of us in the US haven’t seen season five yet, did that change in the final season?

PA: Yes and No. I’d say my story lines get a little bit more serious, but he’s still got some really fun, great lines, and there’s comic relief, but I guess Vex gets more of a serious story line if we can call it that. There’s a scene in (episode) seven that I could not forget.

EV: I laughed out loud when I read it!

PA: So in (episode) seven, you get a big bombshell. But there is still some comic stuff, I mean they have to.

Q: One of the things that we cater to at The Geekiary is the queer community, and obviously Lost Girl deals with a lot of sexuality issues. Have you received any feedback from the queer community at all about the show or what it’s done?

PA: Well obviously we see through tweets and through Facebook and through meeting our fans at the cons. It has a profound effect on a lot of people because there’s a lot of outsiders on the show. All the characters are kind of offbeat, they’re outsiders, and they’re characters you wouldn’t normally see on television by and large. They’re kind of complicated and odd and quirky, and the characters are exploring their sexuality in different ways, and those characters you will not see definitely on mainstream television. So we see a lot of that, and it’s great because the people that we meet, they may be a little quirky, may be a little different, their preferences may not be mainstream, and they identify with what we’re doing. So that’s been the cool thing about the show. And it’s nice to represent a faction of society, people amongst us that don’t see themselves on television.

EV: Definitely. I think we’ve gotten a very strong response from people saying, ‘Thank you for giving us a voice, thank you for representing our community in a positive way, and in a more realistic way.’ I mean not totally a realistic way with fairies and werewolves and things, but aside from that, very real.

Q: Speaking of fantasy, did enjoy doing the genre projects and would you do it again?

EV: Yeah, I love the sci-fi and the fantasy elements. It’s getting to play make-believe in the most fantastic way and re-living your childhood, but as a job. I enjoy it. It’s outside of the normal scope of things we get to do usually.

PA: It’s my first foray into the genre world. It’s interesting because I think there’s a massive drive toward that at the moment. It seems like everyone either wants to go to space or to go to a fantasy land. We were quite lucky that the show came out right on the cusp of this explosion of genre, and even like C2E2 and the cons: they’re exploding. And culture even in television has really gone down that route so it’s been really cool to explore that as it’s exploded. And we’ve been very lucky to be a part of that. Everyone wants to get away from the world we live in. It’s the ultimate escape. We all go to the theater or we go watch a film as a sort of cathartic release from the daily grind but to explore genre in the way that culture is at the moment, it makes us pose questions like “why do we want to get away so much?” I think it’s probably because life is pretty difficult right now.

Q: Our tagline here at The Geekiary is that we are fans and we have feelings. What gives you feelings?

EV: Unicorns. Horses. If there were unicorns.

PA: I’m Welsh, so to be honest, I get very passionate about sports and rugby. That’s kind of my deal. But I like my profession, what I do. I love cooking.

EV: You’re an excellent cook.

PA: That’s the one thing I’m passionate about. But I do like to cook. A lot. I like to cook Thai a lot, I like to go through all the different curries. It’s a very cathartic experience. I love Mexican food. But then I like French bistro cooking as well. But I like everything.

Q: What will see you in next?

PA: I’m not allowed to say! But you will find out at SDCC. Well, you’ll find out before that, but I am not allowed to tell you what it is. It’s big. It’s a cool kind of big project. It’s very different from Vex.

EV: I am on the new season of Mistresses which premieres in June.

PA: So we are both really busy right now.

 

Author: Erin Linn

Erin reviews Orphan Black, iZombie, Penny Dreadful, The Expanse, and many many movies. She has a keen eye for on-screen chemistry, and loves to tackle the subject of casting. She is also our horror aficionado. She live tweets shows, and loves to share her feelings. Erin has a BA in History, and likes to analyze the lore behind historical fiction and horror. She attends San Diego Comic Con and C2E2 every year.



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